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Old 10-08-2011, 11:48 AM   #31
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Every single president from Reagan to W. have been on the de-regulate train and our latest President has done nothing to fix it (Not that he can now with the Congress we have, but I'm not sure he would if he could.) It's all about the money that flows into their pockets, and their re-election campaigns. The fox has watched the hen house in this country for years and years now.

Here's the thing. I would be all for de-regulation, 100% on board, if those companies were also allowed to "fail." But they aren't. They make bad decisions and we bail them out. If someone from the middle class opened a small business, made bad decisions and failed, the government will not be swooping in to save us, just like they weren't swooping in to save our homes when the bubble burst. The banks made it through the mess, while countless people lost their homes, and it wasn't just about people that couldn't afford it when they first signed the bottom line. Many were the middle class that lost their jobs in the recession.

In my opinion, there should be selective regulation. Let a company decide whether to be regulated or not, knowing if they are, they can eligible for government help in case of failure, if not, fail. You can't have both here.

As far as education goes... In general, the middle class higher educated people vote Democrat. That's a known fact. So, the Republicans have been on an education war for decades. They raise prices, de-fund schools, try to turn all schools charter and private business owned rather than public, and jump on their media pulpit calling colleges "liberal institutions." I have seen many of my Republican friends say their kids won't be going to college, or those "liberal institutions", so it works. In the meantime, we see charter (free) schools popping up owned by big corporations or their founders. Don't tell me there won't be an education agenda here. Can you imagine sending your kids to the Walmart school of thought? Hell, when my son got a job at Target for awhile, they spent a whole day in training talking about why it would be a bad thing to go union. Give me a break. If an employee is treated well, then they don't even think about going union. How about trying that tactic?

On top of that, Republicans use social issues to get re-elected. People will vote against their own financial interests in order to keep gay marriage or abortion illegal. People will vote against their financial and livelihoods if they believe that one guy that mentions "moral values" and "family" and "Jesus". Personally, I think all of our politicians should just stay out of the social debate, but that will never happen because it gets people elected.

Republicans also are not what they used to be. They used to be known as the more "fiscally responsible" and yet now spend spend spend. Corporate welfare, wars...

Democrats on the other hand tend to focus on the poor. Food Stamps, unemployment, Medicaid, etc. They were always known as the high spenders, the deficit creators. They sit on the fence, for the most part, on social issues. They won't go one way or the other. So electing them in order to be more social conscience is a mistake. The anti-whatevers will always win on the social issues, because Democrats know electing their candidate on that issue is just a wash.

The problem here, as I have always said, is that there is no party that focuses on the middle class. It's either rich or poor. The "job creators" or the hungry. First, the mega rich are NOT job creators (unless you count the jobs out of country) and handing money to the poor does nothing if there are no jobs to be had by them. The middle are the job creators. The middle start small businesses in the community, employing the unemployed. The middle creates jobs IN this country. The middle buys the big boys products, allowing them to get more rich. The middle feeds the poor with jobs so they can buy their own food, pay their own rent, and get off the unemployment government payroll. The fight in Washington is a lose/lose for the middle class. You want to create more jobs? Then the middle should be the focus. The middle should get the tax write-offs, the middle should get the subsidies, the middle is who should be "bailed out" and kept afloat. Get rid of the middle, and we might as well rename this country Mexico.
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Old 10-10-2011, 07:13 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by TheKdd View Post
Every single president from Reagan to W. have been on the de-regulate train and our latest President has done nothing to fix it (Not that he can now with the Congress we have, but I'm not sure he would if he could.) It's all about the money that flows into their pockets, and their re-election campaigns. The fox has watched the hen house in this country for years and years now.

Here's the thing. I would be all for de-regulation, 100% on board, if those companies were also allowed to "fail." But they aren't. They make bad decisions and we bail them out. If someone from the middle class opened a small business, made bad decisions and failed, the government will not be swooping in to save us, just like they weren't swooping in to save our homes when the bubble burst. The banks made it through the mess, while countless people lost their homes, and it wasn't just about people that couldn't afford it when they first signed the bottom line. Many were the middle class that lost their jobs in the recession.

In my opinion, there should be selective regulation. Let a company decide whether to be regulated or not, knowing if they are, they can eligible for government help in case of failure, if not, fail. You can't have both here.

As far as education goes... In general, the middle class higher educated people vote Democrat. That's a known fact. So, the Republicans have been on an education war for decades. They raise prices, de-fund schools, try to turn all schools charter and private business owned rather than public, and jump on their media pulpit calling colleges "liberal institutions." I have seen many of my Republican friends say their kids won't be going to college, or those "liberal institutions", so it works. In the meantime, we see charter (free) schools popping up owned by big corporations or their founders. Don't tell me there won't be an education agenda here. Can you imagine sending your kids to the Walmart school of thought? Hell, when my son got a job at Target for awhile, they spent a whole day in training talking about why it would be a bad thing to go union. Give me a break. If an employee is treated well, then they don't even think about going union. How about trying that tactic?

On top of that, Republicans use social issues to get re-elected. People will vote against their own financial interests in order to keep gay marriage or abortion illegal. People will vote against their financial and livelihoods if they believe that one guy that mentions "moral values" and "family" and "Jesus". Personally, I think all of our politicians should just stay out of the social debate, but that will never happen because it gets people elected.

Republicans also are not what they used to be. They used to be known as the more "fiscally responsible" and yet now spend spend spend. Corporate welfare, wars...

Democrats on the other hand tend to focus on the poor. Food Stamps, unemployment, Medicaid, etc. They were always known as the high spenders, the deficit creators. They sit on the fence, for the most part, on social issues. They won't go one way or the other. So electing them in order to be more social conscience is a mistake. The anti-whatevers will always win on the social issues, because Democrats know electing their candidate on that issue is just a wash.

The problem here, as I have always said, is that there is no party that focuses on the middle class. It's either rich or poor. The "job creators" or the hungry. First, the mega rich are NOT job creators (unless you count the jobs out of country) and handing money to the poor does nothing if there are no jobs to be had by them. The middle are the job creators. The middle start small businesses in the community, employing the unemployed. The middle creates jobs IN this country. The middle buys the big boys products, allowing them to get more rich. The middle feeds the poor with jobs so they can buy their own food, pay their own rent, and get off the unemployment government payroll. The fight in Washington is a lose/lose for the middle class. You want to create more jobs? Then the middle should be the focus. The middle should get the tax write-offs, the middle should get the subsidies, the middle is who should be "bailed out" and kept afloat. Get rid of the middle, and we might as well rename this country Mexico.

I couldn't agree with that more....
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Old 10-10-2011, 12:40 PM   #33
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And let me also say that I am getting really tired of the way some in Washington, some trying to get to Washington, and some media elites are referring to the Occupy movement and the people involved.

How about instead, get off your asses to fix the problems, instead of calling people names and pointing fingers at whose to blame. It's our right to protest when we feel protest is needed. It's the American way. Some of the same assholes who are calling these people names and saying shit are the same assholes who were encouraging the Tea Party protests.

And Herman Cain... On the protests, has said things like this:

The protests are anti-American, anti-capitalism and a distraction from failed Obama policies.

"Part of it is jealousy, I stand by that, and here's why I don't have a lot of patience with that: my parents, they never played the victim card. My parents never said, 'We hope that the rich people lose something so we can get something'. No, my dad's idea was, 'I want to work hard enough so I can buy a Cadillac - not take somebody else's'. "

"Don't blame Wall Street, don't blame the big banks. If you don't have a job, blame yourself. It is not someone's fault if they succeeded, it is someone's fault if they failed."

Jealousy? What an asshole. Just proves he just doesn't get it. So I guess to him, we should let the banks take our homes, rob us of our savings, and get "bailed" out on their own bad decisions? Let them continue their oil speculation and other illegal bullshit. They are the "job creators" after all right?
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Old 10-10-2011, 12:48 PM   #34
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GGGRRR anybody on my Facebook knows how I feel about all the judgement that's being thrown around at these folks with the guts to stand up for the injustices done to us middle folks. I scoffed about that same quote from Cain a few days ago. That stance they came out with last week sure doesn't sound like something cobbled together by some uneducated, smelly drug users looking for a hand out, now does it?
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Old 10-10-2011, 12:54 PM   #35
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I think the only ones that are really jealous here is the Tea Party. They're just pissed that this protest is bigger than theirs LOLOL
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Old 10-10-2011, 01:26 PM   #36
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The marchers are losers. I've seen them. Most are smelly hippies. And all of them are out there drinking Starbucks, talking on their cell phones, texting, etc. Who the hell do you think is responsible for all of that, hippies? I'll tell you- BIG BUSINESS!!!
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Old 10-10-2011, 01:45 PM   #37
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Well, my pot induced coma is telling me that I should boycott all big business. Then who'll be dependent upon who?

Someone pass the bag of Goldfish and homegrown peanut butter.
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Old 10-10-2011, 01:55 PM   #38
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Well then I must be a loser and a smelly hippie LMAO.

I drink Starbucks sometimes. I have a cell phone with a texting plan. Course, I have downgraded my plan to the minimum to not give the big business that actually got money back this year as much money as I could. I have been thinking about switching to Credo Mobile. I downgraded my cable, to not give them as much of my money. I have been thinking about going antenna instead. I use a credit union. My home phone is about to be free with Ooma. If I had the money, I would have solar panels on my home to benefit the environment, and not to give big electric my money. I try, to the best of my ability, to have my money going to smaller homegrown companies. I have termites, and have to get tented this weekend. I chose a local small business rather than the big boys. I try and buy American made products. (That isn't always easy.) I try and go to small businesses when I can, rather than the big corporate franchises. (Starbucks being a downfall here, but at least they are hiring here in the U.S.A. and treat their employees well.) I will not step foot in a Walmart, ever. I will never do business with Chase, Bank of America or the like. I have essentially either gotten rid of every credit card I own, and rarely if ever use the ones I still have. If a company does something I don't like or agree with, then I take my business elsewhere. Will they survive without me? Sure. Do I make a huge difference? Probably not.

That is not to say big business doesn't have it's place. I don't believe the "Occupy" movement is about getting rid of, or "sticking" it to big business. It's about getting angry over the illegal practices. It's about "bailing" out big banks for and with the bad decisions they made and not bailing out the homeowners for the bad decisions they may have made. It's about still handing out millions of dollars in bonuses to CEO's that were in charge of those bad decisions. It's about still going on with their illegal practices, all in the name of money. Is about the tax loopholes that big businesses jump through to pay no taxes, while average americans pay thousands. It's about oil speculation, coffee speculation etc. raising prices on our gas and other products just because they can. It's about big business receiving handouts, all the while laying people in America off, hiring overseas instead. It's about the working class and middle class disappearing. It's about inequality in tax burden, wage earning, and government representation. It is about this country becoming the Corporate States of America. Big business has it's place, and it's not in our government.

That's the way I see it, and if that makes me a loser or a smelly hippie, well then I guess I need to go burn some more of my patchouli incense.
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Old 10-11-2011, 09:25 AM   #39
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(Reuters) - Tahrir Square in Cairo, Green Square in Tripoli, Syntagma Square in Athens and now Zuccotti Park in New York -- popular anger against entrenching power elites is spreading around the world.

Many have been intrigued by the Occupy Wall Street movement against financial inequality that started in a New York park and expanded across America from Tampa, Florida, to Portland, Oregon, and from Los Angeles to Chicago.

Hundreds of activists gathered a month ago in the Manhattan park two blocks from Wall Street to vent their anger at what they see as the excesses of New York financiers, whom they blame for the economic crisis that has struck countless ordinary Americans and reverberated across the global economy.

In the U.S. movement, Arab nations see echoes of this year's Arab Spring uprisings. Spaniards and Italians see parallels with Indignados (indignant) activists, while voices in Tehran and Beijing with their own anti-American agendas have even said this could portend the meltdown of the United States.

Inspired by the momentum of the U.S. movement, which started small but is now part of U.S. political debate, activists in London will gather to protest outside the London Stock Exchange on October 15 on the same day that Spanish groups will mass on Madrid's Puerta del Sol square in solidarity.

"American people are more and more following the path chosen by people in the Arab world," Iran's student news agency ISNA quoted senior Revolutionary Guards officer Masoud Jazayeri as saying. "America's domineering government will face uprisings similar to those in Tunisia and Egypt."

Chinese newspapers splashed news about Occupy Wall Street with editorials blaming the U.S. political system and denouncing the Western media for playing down the protests.

"The future of America stands at a crossroads. Presuming that effective measures to relieve the social mood and reconstruct justice cannot be found, it is not impossible that the Occupy Wall Street movement might be the final straw under which America collapses," said a commentary in the Global Times.

"This movement has uncovered a scar on American society, an iceberg of accumulated social conflicts has risen to the surface," said the commentary in the tabloid, which is owned by the Communist Party mouthpiece, the People's Daily.

"THIS IS TAHRIR SQUARE"

In Cairo, Ahmed Maher, a founder and leading member of Egypt's April 6 Youth Movement which helped to topple autocrat Hosni Mubarak, said it was in contact with several groups organizing the anti-Wall Street demonstrations.

"A few days ago we saw a banner in New York that said 'This is Tahrir Square'," Maher said, referring to the Cairo square that became the epicenter of Egypt's revolution.

"The Arab Spring has definitely inspired the burst of protests in the United States and Europe."

Others noted differences between Arab protesters and U.S. protesters, branded by one Republican presidential candidate as "anti-American" and so jealousy-ridden that they wanted to "take somebody else's ... Cadillac."

"The Arab protests started with requests for reform but quickly transformed into demands for governments to leave, or at least their leaders," said Abdulaziz al-Uwaisheg, columnist in Saudi daily al-Watan. "The American protest is against specific policies ... It did not ask to change the government."

Spanish media have devoted daily coverage to Occupy Wall Street, dubbing participants "Indignados in Manhattan," with left-leaning newspapers saying the U.S. protesters were inspired by Spain's own disenchanted youth-led grouping.

"Occupy Wall Street is one more branch of a global movement," said Veronica Garcia, a 40-year-old lawyer involved in the Spanish demonstrations.

MARCHES INSPIRED BY MOVEMENT

While Spain's "Indignados" have poured much of their anger so far on politicians, Garcia said Saturday's Madrid march was likely to focus more on bankers.

In London, which was hit by rioting and looting by disaffected people in early August, protesters were using social media like Facebook and Twitter to plan their Stock Exchange protest on Saturday.

The Occupy London protest aims to draw attention to "the economic systems that have caused terrible injustices around the world," according to their website.

"Bankers have got off scot-free whilst the people of this country are being punished for a crisis they did not create," a statement on the website said, echoing the chant taken up by U.S. marchers: "We are the 99 percent."

Unions, which organized protests against austerity moves in debt-stricken Greece, welcomed the New York protests.

"It's optimistic because we haven't seen such protests before," Greek public sector unionist Despina Spanou told Reuters. "There is no coordination so far because most of this is spontaneous, but we cannot rule anything out."

Newspapers around the world have sought to identify the true motor of discontent driving the Occupy Wall Street movement, with the Korea Herald seeing an historic dimension reflecting the civil rights movement and anti-Vietnam War rallies.

"But perhaps the closest historical parallel is with the Populist movement of the 1890s, which, like Occupy Wall Street, was a broad, economics-driven revolt that targeted a predatory class of corporate capitalists - the robber barons of the Gilded Age," the newspaper said.

"THERE'S SOMETHING HAPPENING HERE"

Japan's Kyodo news agency ran an interview from New York with organizer Kalle Lasn who said he hoped that "Occupy Wall Street" would inspire Japan's jobless youth.

"Is there some beginning of some kind of 'Occupy Tokyo' or 'Occupy Marunouchi', something like that happening in Japan right now or not?" Kyodo quoted Lasn as saying, referring to the Marunouchi business district in Tokyo.

The Occupy Wall Street protests across the United States with their focus on banking bailouts and unfairness appeared to present a dilemma for Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin.

The protests support one Kremlin agenda by underscoring the economic troubles of Moscow's Cold War foe, but could also send a signal encouraging street protests -- not what Putin wants as he heads toward a second stint as president in a March vote.

This July, Putin said the United States was "acting like hooligans" in the global economy. In August, he said the United States was living beyond its means "like a parasite."

Putin and President Dmitry Medvedev have not spoken publicly about the protests, but state-run TV stations they use to shape opinion seem to have found a way around the contradiction.

Footage of crowds protesting against perceived corporate greed and government connivance echoed the emphasis on U.S. economic inequality that was a Soviet-era propaganda staple.

Such footage may also back up Putin's argument for a tight state rein on Russia's corporate world -- and his colorful depictions of the United States as a flagging, sometimes dangerously irresponsible financial power.

At the same time, news footage often focusing on outspoken, outlandishly dressed participants in the U.S. protests appeared aimed at lending the crowds a circus-like look that could be to discourage Russians from trying this at home.

The Chinese, however, have not been so subtle, using the movement to fire repeated broadsides at the capitalist system.

"The Occupy Wall Street movement was sparked by the extreme disparity between the rich and the poor," the Hong Kong Economic Journal said in its editorial.

"Now it looks like the spark is being turned into a great fire that is spreading to other countries."

British commentators were not so convinced by such an apocalyptic vision. Giles Whittell in the London Times, highlighting the movement's lack of a coherent agenda, came to the conclusion in a headline that it was: "Passionate but Pointless."
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Old 10-11-2011, 10:13 AM   #40
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Okay, I'm going to post this here, because it's highly alarming:

As Terp and I discussed in another thread, the housing crisis brought about the collapse in the financial institutions. The housing crisis was started by Clinton Adminsitration, which I concede, because of the growing inequality between all of the classes. In order to appease the lower classes they made all sorts of deals, such as the FHA lowering the MINIMUM for a down payment to 3%. The root cause of this? The one author claimed the education system, where only 3/10 Americans have a college degree. I speculate that's incorrect, but that's my belief. All these homeowners began taking out equity loans on houses that were inflated, and when the boom happened...well, you know the rest.

Now, as for these activists? Their anger, yes, is pointed in the correct direction. But it should also be pointed directly at Washington D.C. But, is this the result of the inequality that is growing in America? Degrees are going to become even harder to receive, because colleges are continuing to raise prices and governments are not supplying help to students/universities.

Thoughts?
Become an illegal immigrant and get instate tuition and probably a free education on top of that...

Why is it OK to Blast the Tea Party and not the protesters? Just asking....The tea party is trying to lower our taxes, giving the gov't back to the people...The protesters are doing what? They need to be in DC at The White House not at Wall Street...The ones in power won't do shit because it takes money from their pockets for reelection or to be elected...I am just so fed up with the BS in DC...I have said for years there should be a term limit on these asses in DC..Why, make them pay SS like the rest of us and then it will be fixed...They don't give a crap about SS because they get their pay from the tax payer not SS....Make them pay into like the rest of us and I guarantee something would be done....I hate Politicians...They are all Liars...

I don't care how much of the US budget is given to foreign countries, we can't even get our deficit down, that money whether 1% or 20% needs to stay here in this country...I say the hell with other countries...We just sent 1.7 billion dollars to Egypt? Why? I jut don't get it...If they can't make it to freaking bad...We borrow money to give these people money???ERRRRR That's it for me today...I get so upset talking about this BS....That's all politicians are that and liars.......
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